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in changing religious laws in america, i guess? >> guest: well, the salvation army, which people don't realize, is an evangelical religious group, not just a group that rings bells outside department stores in the christmas season. the salvation army believed in what they called the cathedral of the open air and would go into areas, especially impoverished areas, and have parades and make lots of noise with brass bands and cymbals, and loud preaching trying to attract, especially the urban poor, back into religious life. this came up against requirements of many cities that any parade be permitted, and the salvation army made it a practice not to apply for permits, and to be arrested, often playing instruments into the way into the cell, and challenges laws as anti-religious, and they won and lost a lot of them. they destabilized the law of the states by challenging these restrictions, and they never really made it to the supreme court of the united states, though, because the states were still in power. >> host: professor gordon, when did the first major religious case come before the supreme
the wealthiest men in america, merchants, among them, john hancock, yes, thee bold john hancock on the declaration of independence whose name is synonymous with signature. long before that, he was arguably the wealthiest merchant banker in america living on beacon hill with a commanding view of the massachusetts landscape and sea scape. far from espousing individual liberty, hancock and his fellow merchants in new england, governed their businesses and communities with economic ruthlessness that often left their competitors homeless and penniless. like today's tea party movement, the colonial tea party had almost nothing to do with tea. tea was nothing more than a social beverage for wealthy women. men seldom draping it, and it ranked below ail and rum among beverages americans consumed most. the tea party movement that sparked the american revolution actually began 20 years earlier in the 1750s and 1760s when new england business leaders like today's tea party supported a costly government war, but refused to pay higher taxes to cover the cost of that war. the war had started i
.com/booktv. >> for the next 45 minutes, larry schweikart presents a history of america's global participation and influence from 1898-1945. he also posits that during this time the united states introduced numerous political, cultural, and economic ideas to the rest of the world. >> good afternoon. thank you for joining us here at the heritage foundation in our lewis lemon auditorium. we, of course, welcome those who joins honor heritage.org website on all of these. would ask everyone here in house if you'd be so kind to check cell phones one last time and see that they are turned off. thank you, louis. amazing how many speakers actually start doing that. we will post the program on a website within 24 hours for your future reference, and, of course, our internet viewers are always welcome to e-mail us with questions or comments, simply writing those to speaker@heritage.org. our guest today, doctor larry schweikart is a native arizonan turkey on this bachelor and masters degree at arizona state university and received his doctorate from university of california, santa barbara. throughout his high school an
, a member of president obama's inaugural faith council, argues that america should strive to be a pluralistic country where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than a fissure between people. this is about an hour 20. >> good evening, everyone and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my u.s. best friend, eboo patel. i've had a wonderful time reading this book, and am very excited about having this conversation with him and then drawing you into that conversation. one of the delights about his book is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had many when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have a small breakfast, and then have a time with -- [inaudible] one of my favorite poets. and i thought it was really wonderful if we all could have kind of a moment of censuring around eboo reading one of his favorite poems. how does that sound? >> all right. thank you for the invitation to thank you all for being here. so, this is a poem that actually first heard where rumi is bu
.com/booktv. >> enter now eboo patel, a member of president obama's inaugural council argues that america should strive to be a pluralistic economy where religion is a bridge to cooperation rather than official between people. this is about an hour 20. [applause] >> good evening and thanks for being here. i am very excited to be with my newest best friend, eboo patel. i have had a wonderful time reading his book. i'm very excited about having a conversation with him and in drawing him into that -- drawing you when that conversation. one of the delights is his disclosing something of his own spiritual practice, particularly during the holy season of ramadan. he had me when he said that prior to entering the day he would get up, have his small breakfast and then have a time with a poem. one of my favorite poets. i thought it would be wonderful if we all could have a moment of centering around one of his favorite running pomes. how does that sound? all right. thank you for that invitation and thank you all for being here this is a poem that i actually first heard in turkey. come, come, whoever you are, wo
of that has left america. we still are a world leader when it comes to complex, advanced manufacturing. we make almost 80% of our steel here. we make tremendous amount of planes here, and we're neck-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actuall
of allegiance. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america. and to the republic for which it stands, one nation, under god, indivisible with liberty and justice for all. thank you, please be seated. >> before we get started i'd like to have guests tonight. a date to begin with a welcome to one of the members of our board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california, pete wilson. governor. [applause] also with us tonight is our terrific congressman from houston guy really is retiring after 26 years. [applause] are scum her supervisor, foy. [applause] for the city who are patient enough to go through the book signing line, just prior to the event this evening coming in at this wonderful woman to see woman is here with us today. she's the best selling "new york times" best-selling author. it is a gentleman, please join me in welcoming calista gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a very special guest. i know that if i were simply to get the typical dinner circuit introduction speaker did newt gingrich, the one where you list every accomplishment. i pr
that were necessary to achieve the long-term bipartisan debt-reduction program that america desperately needs. we're over $16.4 trillion in debt. i'm in my last days as a u.s. senator. if you'd told me when i started that we'd be $16 trillion in debt, i wouldn't have believed it. frankly, if you told me just a dozen years ago at the end of the clinton administration when we were in surplus that we could possibly be $16 trillion in de debt, i would have thought -- well, i would have thought you were not reality-tested. but here we are, and most everybody knows that the way we're going to get out of this is with a combination of tough medicine. i call it tough love. we're going to have to reduce spend, and we can't do it all from discretionary spending. and the budget control act that we adopted last summer -- that is, the sum o summer of 2011 --s it all from discretionary spending. what's discretionary spending? it's different from entitlement spending -- medicare, medicaid, et cetera. it's what most people think of as the government. it's education programs, it's environmental protectio
myself, you know, what's the america that we'd like to see for these children when they grow up? what is the america that we're headed towards if we don't correct ourselves? i believe it's still possible to build an attractive future in, say, 2050 for today's children, but it won't be easy, and we haven't got much time to do it. so what does that future look like, how do we get there and what do we do now? these are the questions that i address in the book. and i want to talk about four points that correspond to the four parts of the book. the first is the imperative of system change. if we look at the conditions and trends in our country today, we have to admit it's damn distressing. you know, in the book i review a huge load of problems afflicting our country economically, environmentally, socially, politically and conclude that what we have is a bad case of system failure. and, thus, the imperative of system change. when you have encompassing problems spreading across the entire national landscape, it can't be for small reasons. it's the system, stupid. and we live and work in this
states of america. and to the republican for which it stands, one nation under god, and with lib if i and justice for all. thank you. please be seated. before we get started ilgd like to recognize a few special guests we have with us. i would like to begin with a welcome to one of our members of board of trustees and the former governor of the state of california pete wilson. governor. [applause] [applause] our county supervisor peter floyd. peter, thank you for coming. [applause] now for those of who who were patient enough to go through the book signing line prior to the event this evening we yo know the wonderful woman is here with us tonight. she's "the new york times" best selling officer and president of gingrich productions. please join me in recognizing calista fig h -- gingrich. [applause] we have with us tonight a special guest. if i i know if i were simply to give the typical dinner circuit gingrich the one where you list every accomplishment of the speaker's bio. i promise you we would be here all night and newt would get bored. the list of achievements in politics, his in
of the impetus for prioritizing the issue of poverty came from the other america, a best-selling study of poverty by holy cross alumnus michael harrington who found poverty hidden in appalachia and if america's inner -- and in america's inner cities. shriver accepted the challenge and got to work first of all researching the scope of the problem and its possible solutions. he found 30 million americans then live anything poverty -- living in poverty, and his agenda for them was not handouts, but employment through programs like the preschool head start program, a job corps to retrain adults for an increasingly postindustrial economy and vista, volunteers in service to america, often described as a domestic peace corps. there were programs stressing community leadership, local planning with federal funds, and there were legal services for the poor. in time the war on poverty raised up resentment from some public officials who were challenged by the fewly-empowered poor. newly-empowered poor. meanwhile, slowly but inexorably, the war in vietnam drew funding away from slave's operation. offered a ch
is based on the david and goliath narrative. big is bad, small is good. so big things like america, the military, breakfast buffets are seen as evil and people can make fun of them. when you are in europe you can make fun of how americans are. i lived there for three years of of the small things however are seen as somewhat heroic. pair troopers are seen as freedom fighters because they are small. ows was a tiny faction was seen as cool and activism is and dana perino. [laughter] the media embraces david over goliath even if david is evil. if america were a house, the left would move to the -- i used that before and it worked. i'm not trying to say that the left are bad people. i'm just saying that they are not people. [laughter] no, no, no, not true. why i say that is because that is what they do. even if it's a joke. they are people. they are some of my favorite people but they don't own the turf that is ridiculed. so why is the uncool thing important to win an election? the reason people like barack obama is because he is cool. he is a community activist, an organizer. how did t
, in -- if china ever collapsed and america would have a major problem dealing with that. so u.s. policy has always been during world war ii to keep china as one of the big four. so elevated the place. in reality because of logistical problems, because of strategic priority, as i say europe first, china second, it was pretty low. one very good indicator was our -- [inaudible] you. over 60% is commonwealth countries. somewhere among 25 went to soviet union. during the entire war, less than 2% went to china. so you see, china was very important, but in terms of material support was very small. that was very ironic. has lot to do with rivalry, policy, priorities, logistical difficulties. but overall it's national policy, very important. the time he of course doesn't work the chinese way because americans don't decide to go back to asia. >> how many chinese died during world war ii? >> the numbers vary. the most accepted number during the seven years, eight years of war, remember world war ii lasted a lot longer in china, was 15 million. >> 15 million? >> 50 million. >> that's on par or close to what t
for you to do in kandahar. >> rajiv chandrasekeran, here is his most recent book, "little america: the war within the war for afghanistan." he has been our guest here on booktv on c-span2. thank you, sir. >> thank you. real pleasure. >> visit booktv.org to watch any of the programs you see here online. type the author or book title in the search bar on the upper left side of the page. click search. you can share anything you see on booktv.org easily by clicking share on the upper left side of the page and selecting the format. booktv streams live online for 48 hours every weekend with top nonfiction books and authors. tv.org. >> next, former speaker of the house newt gingrich presents the second book in his historical fiction series on george washington, "victory at yorktown" but it's a little over an hour. >> good evening, everyone. my name is john, and i had the honor of being executive director of the ronald reagan presidential foundation, and it's my pleasure to welcome all of you here on this rainy evening. in honor of our men and women in uniform who defend our freedom arou
as the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. there was anti-war sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812, but that sentiment was limited. what you see happen is a consensus across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field to officers, politicians, all the signing that a war that was being more less successfully waged in another country was wrong and actually protesting that war. i think this is an interesting moment in american history cover and it takes place in the world that people don't know much about. people don't write about it a lot. it does not have a big place in the historical imagination of americans, and there are a number of reasons for that. often confused with the texas revolution that happen before or ignored altogether. one historian stalker of the u.s.-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. they merit the u.s.-mexico war as the first stop on the road to secession, arguing that the land that came from mexico with the close of the war wa
that group selection is the reason for human evolution. steve cole, president of the new america foundation, investigates the power and global influence of exxonmobil in "private empire: exxonmobil and american power." for an extended list of ligs to 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site, booktv.org or our facebook page, facebook.com/booktv. >> booktv continues now with diana furchtgott-roth. she takes a look at president obama's green jobs initiative and argues that it hurts the economy. this is about 40 minutes. >> good afternoon. i'm howard, vice president for policy research at the manhattan institute. thanks so much for joining us. the question of of whether and how government, particularly the federal government, directs tax dollars to specific industries was a discussion in last night's presidential debate, and can it's become an important and ongoing theme in the current presidential campaign. the terms on which washington assisted the finance and auto industries have also been the focus of intense debate, but probably the most contentious example of all is the one o
concerned women for america who still claims to be the largest women's political organizational in the united states and she based her organization on five spiritual principles in the bible the family and the patriotism the sanctity of marriage and safety of life and religious parents should have more control for example and what they're taught in school are doing that the equal rights amendment for the wedding was a violation of the fundamental orders of things and winning many of these cases. >> did you interview her for your bookracks. >> she is still in seclusion. she retired about almost 15 years ago and lives in california again. >> somebody would have liked to talk to? >> i would very much like to talk to her, and one of the things i think is really important is that an organization like hers which was so involved, so foundational to the conservative women political activism in the papers are not deposited anywhere. they are not available to be read. other women, if phillys schlaffley and the like beverley and the concerned women for america desert substantially more atte
to issue when he moved with the slaves to latin america. arrived with the knowledge that issue was feared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted issue as their patron deity, just to scare the christians who wanted them to convert. issue became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america and the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in some parts of brazil, for instance, you find that issue has even been elevated to the supreme deity simply because that was a symbol that was there, the protagonist for freedom. as they find the transposition of deities across the atlantic, not minor, became not only the symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of brazil. like brazilla, for instance. if you go to the heartland of the europa in brazil, and it's quite plain. but in certain parts issue became the supreme deity. now, consider today -- this was the history of the missionaries in africa, and it goes back a couple of centuries. now, imagine that kadi -- to be a faller of the religion, is virtually to earn the death sentence in certain parts
's to america or to texas or to texans or to americans. and these are some of the memories that i will take with me as i leave this great body. and as i said in my actual formal farewell speech, it's easy to be critical and i saw on television the esteem of congress has gone to 5% favorable, and i'm not surprised at that, as my colleague, john mccain, once said, now we're down to blood relatives and paid staff. and, you know, it is easy to criticize. and a lot of reason to criticize, i will admit that things not have been as productive and most certainly the acrimony does show sometimes. but i am going to say as i leave, after almost 20 years in this body, that the people here are all dedicated. there's not one that isn't a dedicated, patriotic american. what we -- we disagree, sometimes violently disagree on the way we should get to our goals. but our agreement is on the goal of keeping america the beacon of freedom to the world, to keeping our military strong, to doing right by all of our people, whether it's a small business person who is creating jobs, who is trying to go up the ladder
produced disaster, heartbreak, crime, death. it has been a disaster for america. most of all for black people, and to the point of it is to say don't fall for white guilt again, america. the last time you fell for it was in 2008, and look what that produced. so don't fall for it again but don't make the same mistake again. and also i think it's a fun book to read. most of it will be stored you have never read before. thank you and i will sign your books now. [applause] >> is this yours? >> know, that's a mine. >> thanks. thank you. are you leaving? >> i have to. spent it's your fault we didn't get to mingle. >> i know. i'm sorry. >> i got to come back to d.c. that's all i'm getting from you? >> you already got enough from me. spent i was just telling my friend how i tell all the whippersnappers, you hang on islands everywhere. you was the one and you just don't even care about that. you don't even care. and also, we always agree. like when we ran off -- i know. my whole support for christie was like running off with a biker. i'm back to romney. you write about that. >> [inaudible] >> i
enthusiastic to largely turning against the war. i think the u.s. and mexico war of the moment of america's first antiwar movement actually coming into being. so there was antiwar sentiment during the revolution, and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. what you see happening in 1847 is a consensus, really, across the board. people from different regions of the country, soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all of this fighting of the war that was being successfully waged in another country. so i think this is a very interesting moment in american history. and it takes place that people don't really know much about this timeframe. the u.s. and mexico war -- people don't write about it a lot. it doesn't have a big place in the historical imagination of americans. there is a number of reasons for that. it is often confused with the texas revolution or ignored altogether. when historians do talk about the us-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. they narrated as sort of the first stop on the road to secession. arguing
of true faith and of courage. and i hope he comes here to america to speak your. i think he has a good message. you're not supposed to be reading. >> i know. but there was something -- i have many more questions, but i think i will focus lastly on one issue that's been, comes out powerful in the book. i recall when you were talking about, it comes up in different ways. that when you're talking about the issue of jews from muslim countries, you mentioned, i guess you asked someone or someone was asked why didn't these jews make a big deal out of this. and one of the things, and one person responded, said we were just not about looking back. we were about starting over and rebuilding, and that's what we are today. i mean, it's true today that there's more of, there's an attempt to raise this issue. i think partially because people, it has a bearing on the question of the palestinian refugees, but otherwise, the people were not inclined really to raise it. it was more about getting on with life and building a new life. similarly, in an odd way not willing on death, which is another aspect
recounts the life of america's sixth president on quincy adams who died in 1848. quincy adams was some of the second president john adams had a long political career which included, aside from his presidency, ten years of secretary of state, senator, congressmen and miniature. this is a little under an hour. i will start with a very simple question. was there a moment you said to yourself i need to write a biography of john quincy adams? >> yes, indeed, there was. a couple years ago when i ran out of any ideas on the founding fathers. others had written on washington, jefferson, madison, and i'd written on patrick henry, james monroe, james hancock. so i pulled out john f. kennedy's cal woods prize-winning book profiles in courage and their in chapter 1 was john quincy adams. i thought his name begins with a xu chapter 1. that's not the reason he was in chapter 1. john kennedy himself a war hero had listed these characters in order of the degree of courage, and he placed john quincy adams first among the most courageous senators and congressmen in american history. he was not just the
, the slogan better read than dead. but, we strongly rejected the idea that america represented the losing side in the struggle against soviet expansionism and the communist play that went with it. to the anti-communist passion we shared with chambers, inseparable from a commensurately powerful love for and faith in the united states of america and the civilization for which it had gone to war against the two great carriers of modern totalitarianism, first not see germany and now communist russia. and on like chambers, we believe that the united states would eventually turn back the communist threat to western civilization, just as surely as it had done to the equally evil threat posed by not to germany. not, mind you, that we underestimated the might of the soviet military or the strength and the resolve of the anti anti-communist forces. against as both at home and abroad. in fact, there were times when we came close to a feeling that chambers and other conservative anti-communist like james vernon who wrote a book entitled suicide of the last, we feared that they might be right. for me, one
was then the most prosperous town in america. it seemed they embodied american values. they were rich, upstanding citizens her father supported abraham lincoln. they were spiritual and were quakers within new england values of thrift to the point* of stinginess with her father and simplicity and plain living. to the quakers wealth was a sign of virtue and god's blessing so they were very blessed but her father really wanted a son. the first child was a girl. it was hetty. he became enraged and was furious. so much that her mother took to her bet. before she was two years old she was sent to live with her grandfather and her spinster aunt. she really wanted her father's love and do the only way to gain it was to earn it. because her father was an obsessed with money and he said so himself. her grandfather taught her to read the newspapers and the stock and bond places when she was a little girl. at the age of eight she opened her own account at a savings bank in town then sent off to the quaker boarding school taught about thrift, eat whatever is put before you, even if much and then if she did no
to the people who live in the united states of america. why? because we share the same values, the same principles, the same heritage and the same enemies. because we are in the middle east today, dean attacked we ask ourselves why these people against the jewish nation in the middle east. not because of the lens we so-called occupied. it is the value we are working upon them in israel and the values of our democracy following very carefully their election here in the united states and beginning to be interesting. but we do father and we do to the american people and the american values. sometimes too much. for example today of independence in israel, a big celebration you'll find people in the israeli flag and the american flag. i don't like it. i put on my car only the israeli flag. why do people do with? to democracy and values of the american people. one of my main point in my book is israel is not america. even though we love america, we are not america and we cannot make mistakes because if you make a mistake, you pay a price, but you are able to correct it. if israel makes the mi
, and south america and the various countries were beginning to rebel against spanish king and the french team and they were going to send and put down rebellions in english would keep the french from growing to south america. they invited americans to join in keeping the french out of south america because south america was rich with all the gold and silver. john quincy adams was secretary of state and said absolutely not, were not going to get involved in foreign wars. we're not going to let them come over here either. the seeds were planted for the monroe doctrine. it was part of monroe's annual message and he announced his cabinet for help in putting together some sort of statement, making our international policy clear. john quincy adams wrote the corporate vision of god. there are three long paragraphs that now call the monroe doctrine. he tells the europeans he does not want to get involved in wars. we don't want anything to do. you stay out of our affairs. the band of the colonial era had come to an end. you can no longer consider americas as father for colonial aspirations and any att
uncle who made the decision in june of 1941, six months before pearl harbor brought america into world war ii, he made the decision that he wanted to fight the war against fascism, and went to england and enlisted as an officer candidate with the british army. he took with him for friends, another man who was a student at harvard, and three other guys who who had recently graduated and were doing what they could to help the cause of freedom and liberty against the forces of nazi fascism speaks that he was studying at harvard at the time. what was he studying and what was his life projector at that point? >> well, he, like his four brothers had grown up in new jersey and vermont where his family had had property for quite, several generations. he went to prep school at st. paul school where he distinguished himself as a student and as a student leader and as an athlete. and like all his brothers in his uncles and his grandfather's before him he went off to harvard. he was quite literary. he was a good writer. he was known as a good writer, and when he went to war he kept journals and wr
visit booktv.org. >> author jon meacham recount it is career of america's third president d recounts the career of america's third president, thomas jefferson. he reports that despite his strong beliefs and opposition to confrontation, president jefferson was able so successfully lead the country in a highly partisan political environment. this is just under an hour. [applause] >> it's all downhill from there. [laughter] my lawyer will take any complaints later. thank you so much, and thank you to what, for what you all do here. i am a, i shopped here as a young washington monthly editor. shopped is too strong. we didn't have any money. as you all may remember, washington monthly editors were paid $10,000 a year which, as kate boo -- who won the national book award last night adding to her amazing list of of accomplishments -- kate used to say she knew she had actually graduated from the monthly when she could buy entrees as well as appetizers in restaurants. so i never actually spent money here, but i'll try to fix that. i am enormously grateful. i am a southerner, i'm from tennesse
that were not impossible, not possible in america are actually happening in germany, and their wages have gone up five times faster that than ours. there's something wrong inside the american economic and political system, and that's what this book is about. >> host: hedrick smith is the author. thank you for being on booktv. >> from the fourth annual boston book festival, a panel featuring author edward glaeser. it's about an hour, 15. >> good afternoon and thank you very much for coming to this auditorium today. let me introduce myself, i'm bob oakes from morning edition on wbur, boston's npr news station. [applause] thank you. thank you. i'm sure some of you are saying, wow, that's bob oakes? [laughter] i thought he was taller -- [laughter] i thought he was thinner, i thought he had more hair. [laughter] and, you know, the funny thing is that all those things were true last week. [laughter] let me thank all of you for coming here this afternoon and thank the boston book festival for having us. don't they do a nice job? isn't this a terrific eventsome. >> yes. [applause] >> let's also t
of sickness, the politics of health insurance, in progress of america at the university of north carolina. in her talk today she is going to speak about her latest book, the book titled is "health care for some". i have the feeling it is relevant to our times. the talk is entitled health care for all, women, activism and women's right to health. this is a history -- her book rather and her talk today will be partly, a history of rights and rationing in the united states from the great depression to the present, and the book just came out by the university of chicago press. i have seen copies of it lying around. vile accounts, beatrix hoffman has simply nailed this big historical topic of to the present moment. i am going to read from the early reviews of the book just to give you a sense of how that is being received. t. r. reid, author of the healing of america, right this. in the american political debate everybody can -- the notion of rationing health care. beatrix hoffman's meticulous history shows that rationing by income, age, employment, etc. has been and remains a central element
who love america and those who don't love america. i would like to add a quote from bill buck lee showing that how much you could love america -- [inaudible] and it's the line from the genesis of oaks in which he says, this country of ours so crazy and mixed up much of the time, and yet, still worth everything. >> well, of course it has flaws. everything has flaws. e everything human has flaws. the question is what you emphasize, and what has been emphasized in our culture for well forty years now, it was increasing intensity, is the flaws. i mean, you've got several generations of kids who have been educated to believe that the country stinks. it was born in sin and continued to be pursue evil object is, et. cetera. that's why i keep harping on this issue. i still think it is the major issue facing us, and conservatives, at least of not all strifes, i have to sigh, are the only force in the country that can be relied upon to -- well, at los, i think stop it. this particular history, i think, we can yell stop and it can succeed. we can draw on the deepest resources of the country'
to latin america. they arrived with the knowledge that isu was geared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted isu. they adopted isu as their patron deity. the christians who wanted them to convert. isu became the paramount symbol of resistance in latin america. in the americas. in fact, it went beyond that. in certain part, you will find that isu has been elevated to the supreme deity. simply because that was a symbol that was there. the protagonist for freedom. and we find transition across the atlantic. it became not only a symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of the world. on the contrary, if you go to the heartland in brazil, it is quite plain. but in certain other parts, isu became the supreme deity. now, consider today, this is the history in africa. and this goes back a couple of centuries. to be a follower of this religion, it is virtually to earn a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also in the a death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. many christians respond in kind. but the level of intolerance, ba
with his slaves to latin america. arrived with knowledge that issue was feared by the christian missionaries. the slaves adopted issued as the patron dod, just to scare the christians who wanted them to convert. became symbol of resistance in latin america and america's. in fact, it went beyond the. in certain parts of brazil, for instance, you find that issue has even been elevated to the supreme dod, simply because that was a symbol that was there, protagonists for freedom. so you find the transposition across the atlantic, not minor but certainly became not only a symbol of resistance in the new world, but the supreme deity in certain parts of brazil. on the contrary if you go to the heart by and of brazil and to go to a shrine, the hierarchy is quite plain. but in certain other parts, issue became supreme deity. now consider today, this is the history in africa. and this goes back a couple of centuries. now imagine that today, to be a follower of that religion is virtually to earn the death sentence in certain parts of nigeria. christians also earn a death sentence in certai
of the real crash, america's coming bankruptcy. how to save yourself and your country. here is the cover of the book published by st. martin's press. what do you think when you talk about a government goebel? >> let's go back. we had two big bubbles, we had the stock market bubble because initially the chief money supplied to the economy by the fed and the stock market has had a lot of the crazy stock is replaced by a larger bubble in the real estate in which we expanded this economy based on all of the false rules while people were spending money that they don't have come in and we have a lot of consumption and employment that was a function of the wealth. that bubble burst and now all of the achieved money that the fed was creating was going into the government through the bond market. the government was able to borrow enormous amounts of money and all true low interest rates thanks to the fed coming and now we have an economy that is dependent on all of this excess government spending in the cheap money and you can see it in the price of the bond but like the two prior bubbles it is g
know you had your art set on a tablet would degrade if you if could get america's number one selling13 in. computer in the world. how much getting it at home for less in $200. how about getting free and yes virginia anything wanted to, net read, watch movies and the list goes on and on. the famous kindle fire and that is part we have planned for you tonight is 3 champac hours of goody but we want to get comfortable and cozy at home. coming up at the end of this hour we have concierge collection and i love only is it 3 flex payments but we have the final 2000 and when they're gone they're gone. these super magic loft mattress our water resistant and stain resistant and then we have a lowest priced advert in some of our hottest sheets to date. i wish we appeal of vision and i wish you could feel these. the pitcher does not do justice but the last time allegra had this on the air they sold out there were very popular and they were not as affordable. the sheets come with allow beautiful and brite and it feels like baby skin against you. also are selling a comforter set is coin to blow you
-- abolitionists that when he got back to america he was going to train slaves and settle them on land as sharecroppers in the '70s that they would become good citizens and free people in the united states but when he got back to the united states things change. >> you can watch this and other programs online at booktv.org. >> next on booktv, greg gutfield fox news's the five says liberals use manufactured our rage and artificial tolerance to deflect criticism of their political and social ideology. the author contends what he deems smart in tolerance should be used to counter liberal argument. it is about an hour. >> thank you. the first library i have been in where i haven't been asked to leave. i am not kidding, actually. i will get to that library joke in a minute. that was going to be my intro but during the signing nymex so many nice people when i was sitting there and are missing their going what would it be like if all of your fans were jerks? wouldn't that tell you something? if all of your fans -- i can't swear in the reagan library but if they were jerks, what if you were bi
see the extraordinary expansion in africa, latin america, or evangelicalism in our own country as a sign today of new hope? i leave you that for the discussion period. thank you. [applause] >> i want to begin by quoting stockdale who said who am i, and what am i doing here? the first thing that occurs to me is perhaps i had been invited because i am the owner of a hat that looks remarkably like the one that chambers' models on the cover of the program. [laughter] it's possible. i've been invited because i'm an avid viewer of "homeland" about a trader working his way up in the u.s. government positioning himself as a vice president and the mas nations of a henry wallace. i think the more obvious reason why i'm invited because nathaniel is extremely, extremely, very, very, very persistent and would not take no for an answer although i explainedded i have little knowledge of chambers beyond reading the book when i was proxzly 16 years old, and having been influenced by it, i'm not in any way an expert on chambers, witness, influence, but i will talk as directed. [laughter] i want
against the war. i see the u.s.-mexico war as a moment of america's first antiwar movement coming into being. so there's antiwar sentiment during the revolution and certainly during the war of 1812. that sentiment was limited. but gc happened in 1847 is a consensus across the board. people across the country can soldiers in the field, officers, politicians, all decided that a war was the successful invasion of their country was wrong in protesting the war. so this is an interesting moment in american history and it takes place and they were people don't know much about. the u.s.-mexico were, people don't write about it a lot. it doesn't have a good place in the historical imagination of americans. it's often confused the texas revolution that have been eight years before or ignored altogether. when historians talk about the u.s.-mexico war, they tend to think about the war in relationship to the civil war. they narrowed the war i started the first stop on the road to secession, arguing the land that came from mexico at the close of the war was what really caused sectionalism to he
. >> guest: good to see you. >> host: we debated same-sex marriage across america, and here now with a hot off the press book debating same-sex marriage, oxford university press so let me just start with you, and maybe you could share with me, again, and with the viewers here, what's your best three minute case for gay marriage? >> guest: well, to keep it very simple i think relationships are good for people, marriage is good for relationships, and some of our fellow citizens are gay so when i say that relationships are good for people, not just because they make people happy, although that's app important part of it. we all want to live happily ever after, as it were, but there's also something about having something to come home to at night, wake up with in the morning, share one's joys and sorrows with, be committed to, make sacrifices for. the reason that relationships are good for people is that they make us better people. i'm a better person because of my, you know, ten year-plus relationship with my partner mark. when i say marriage is good for relationships because commitment is go
for all of their input. this book, "in the shadow of greatness" will help america to better understand the sacrificey and the courage of the brave men and women in the families of the greatest military force in the world. freedom is not free. god bless our military families in god bless america. [applause] [applause] [applause] >> thank you ,-com,-com ma lisa. thank you mrs. freeman. war brings sorrow and weakness, but through the challengechallenge s we face over the past 10 years, we also got stronger. and seth lynn my classmate who is a proud marine, a scholar from princeton, has gone on to do things in our nation is going to share those words with you and i'm grateful for his mission in the book and his contribution to this effort. [applause] >> the thanks, josh. like just set -- josh said i'm seth lynn director at gw university and our mission is to train veterans, some of the folks who have contributed to this incredible book to continue serving in public office. and it grew out of a nonprofit i started a few years ago called veterans campaign in my chapter in the book is about s
staff teases me. i was up late with my girlfriend on twitter. when is america going to get a life? it was something i was going back and forth. for those who use social media, things are dumb frankly. i was getting into an intellectual question about the role of government. the person said government should not provide for the nutrition of children and it struck a chord with me because i don't think people think about what that would mean. we don't realize we live in a society where we make small amount of investments early, we make big investments lake. we all in fact are deeply invested in the success of kids because the more the economy grows, artists, teachers, professors and a entrepreneurs, children are the greatest natural resource we have in america, our children. my late -- this woman says this, i go back and she says why don't we see what it is like to live on food stamps or the snap program. i went to bed thinking no big deal. it was a big story. thiokol my staff. guess what i am doing? but it was a powerful thing. one of 14 cities in america with a food policy director
of contemporary writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show. and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, so we would take family vacations across
of the world economy and we need to unleash america's energy entrepreneurs as well. the u.s. can overcome the energy crisis. and a few years, nearly five on my machine technologies that transform petroleum industry in the past five years, the horizontal tracking and other developments that have made it possible with a much smaller surface reached much larger tropes of fuel than in the past. the green energy sources that consumed the most valuable part of the global environment, which is the surface of the earth, air above all soils on the surface of the earth. you know, you have cells in windmills and biofuels and all of these systems waste what is important, which is the surface it ears, while ignoring the almost infinite tropes of energy below the surface of the earth that can be reached with a very small footprint of usable land. >> what is all true wisdom and how does that fit into the capitalist system? >> all true wisdom is an orientation towards the needs of others. i believe capitalism is intrinsically altruistic. that is to say that capitalism is based on making investment withou
african-american church. that is where the inauguration church services took place for america's first black president, bill clinton. [laughter] now, all little nap here for you. things start off at the white house and move along pennsylvania avenue toward the capitol which is on the right. there is a traditional copy of the white house the takes place. it's a big deal on the days when there's a transition from one president to another. it began in 1961, net was a year or allow these pictures were made available. you don't normally see these pictures. here's eisenhower and kennedy command at the same time you have four women together, and these four women actually were the first ladies of our country between 1953 and 1974. on the left that's eisenhower who was the of calling firstly with her back to us, ladybird johnson, jacqueline kennedy who became the new first lady in 1961, and pat nixon, the outgoing wife of the vice-president at that time. another thing that takes place on inauguration day one is a change of power is that by tradition yet going president leaves and of for his suc
successful at cost control and private insurers have been, the great thing about america is we have everything, all possible assistance here. the veterans health administration which is true socialized medicine, the doctors are government employees, is incredibly efficient relative to the rest of the health-care system. >> you did a calculation that showed a health care system, the best in europe or france or germany, we would have no deficit in the baby boom demographics. >> everyone else -- canada is a single payer system but not socialized medicine. medicare for everybody. and is complicated. but it is a mixture of public provision, public health insurance but much heavier hand of government, the same cost as the canadian system but spectacularly good outcomes relative to anybody and britain has a system which is pure socialized medicine and the outcomes are a little better than ours. the cost is 40% better. all of these, if we were able to emulate these things we would be able -- our budget problems would be gone -- and it defies -- one of our two presidential tickets, the signa
that hates america. the pentagon in the department of defense and the only department not subject to audit, that doesn't mean they fail the awe cut or look at all the things they found. they're not subject to audit. what we've been finding figuring out is piece by piece is that for example, since 9/11 in the nine years after 9/11, the pentagon budget went up. the increase in the pentagon budget was $2 trillion. $1 trillion went to the war, the other trillion nobody knows where it went to because the air force has been scaled back, the navy has been scaled back, the army increased margely, but it it's budget was vastly increased. where did the money go? and i think this is a crisis that we're enduring that is going have to require both liberals and conservative to rethink re-examine some of the sacred cows and say we can't afford to say this is off the table for cuts. that's off the table for cuts. nothing is off the table but particularly the waste going on. but also it's not just that they have thrown a lot of money out the window. it's the way they do it. there are two techniques they us
kindle that will say it off. and you do not need me to tell you there is a reasonthat this is america's sweetheart. this is the number-one selling a 7 in. tablet in history and in that there are a lot of traces' especially the 7 in. category and i am proud of the tablets we have done the kindle fire certain animal. not only because the parental controls but the amazon the it will load web pages faster, time is money in at a tablet at home that i purchased from hsn and i'd love it but i do get that up about was trying fight somebody web site and it was not gloating. we all know what it is like. you do want a tablet that is smooth and fasten it tablet you do not have to worry about running out of memory. he may be getting this now or for yourself or your grandkids, who knows what possibilities this will open up. freeg, a one-shot only, we have is what we have. e will pay to send it to $40 on your credit card in a 60 day money back guarantee see you can try it as to buy it and if you are getting it for your children, i will take this from my buyers the display is 20 times stiffer and 30
that they -- writing that they know of in america. one of the things that helps is to be writers ourselves and to know what makes a writer comfortable, to respect a writer who has come for a visit and not treat that writer like some sort of circus side show and to engage that person in conversation. we often like to say and joking among ourselves that we invite writers to dinner, and we just have these couple of public events on either side of the dinner or some gathering after one of those public events. but what really happens is sitting down and having good conversation. it brings writers back. it's actually one of the things that people, i think, most appreciate about the writer's institute. writers will be respected as writers. i remember one writer saying, you know, you go to some literary readings, and you think, gosh, i'm so glad i got through that. let me, you know, catch the next plane out. you go to the writer's institute, and you find yourself saying, wow, that was good. i hope they invite me back. >> mom and dad were high school teachers, and we would take family vacations across the coun
proprietary not in a bad way that in a quite paternal because they cared about the definition of america and the survival and success of america. they did that what drove jefferson this case is the fear that would be swallowed up as a free of the revolution virtually in the world had been by the forces of reaction. i argue in the book that it's impossible life and to understand early american history without seeing the period between the end of the french and indian war and 7063 and the end of the war in 1815 as a 50 year war with britain sometimes hot and sometimes cold but always there. in precise analogy but it would be writing about washington, adams, jefferson, hamilton without reference to this struggle. i think would be like riding but truman, eisenhower, kennedy, johnson, nixon, ford, carter, ronald reagan and not mentioning the soviet union. the foreign policy was that significant and his domestic ramifications were that significant. jefferson was terrified the british were coming back. the good thing about this argument is that they did. so you win the argument. the war of 1812
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